All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
18 07, 2024

The New Everything Dinosaur Homepage is Revealed

By |2024-07-19T07:19:44+01:00July 18th, 2024|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates|0 Comments

The Everything Dinosaur homepage has been upgraded and improved.  The new layout provides customers with more reassurance about the company’s ability to handle deliveries outside of the UK.  In addition, the new format highlights the huge number of 5-star customer reviews that have been received.  The homepage revamp is part of on-going improvements aimed at providing a better user experience.

The new Everything Dinosaur homepage.

The new Everything Dinosaur homepage includes several new features that emphasis the company’s ability to deliver parcels overseas. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A New Everything Dinosaur Homepage

Team members have been working to improve site access for those in the community that have a visual impairment or use screen readers.  Font colours and background colours have been changed to make them easier to read.  Furthermore, the new homepage emphasises the company’s international credentials.  New pages have been created that provide information on international payment options, international deliveries and site security.

Visit the award-winning and now even more user friendly Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Models and Toys.

Mike from Everything Dinosaur confirmed that these new updates were part of an on-going process involving changes to the website to improve the experience of site visitors.

He added:

“We value the feedback we receive from our customers.  With so many five-star customer reviews we wanted to highlight them.  In addition, we felt the need to provide greater reassurance to customers overseas about our ability to handle international orders.”

Outlining the new features of the Everything Dinosaur homepage.

Outlining the new features of the Everything Dinosaur homepage. Demonstrating trust by highlighting the huge number of 5-star customer reviews on both Google and Feefo. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Website Additions and Improvements

New features on the homepage include more visible social media buttons and specific pages providing more information on worldwide delivery.  The customer account links remain, but there are new links to Feefo customer feedback and a link to provide a Google review.  The homepage slider has been refreshed with new slides added.  These slides feature Eofauna Scientific Research models as well as Rebor, PNSO and Haolonggood.

Further changes are planned.  They are all aimed at improving the experience of the user.

For more information or to contact Everything Dinosaur about the website’s contents: Email Everything Dinosaur.

15 07, 2024

New Baryonyx Dinosaur Model to be Introduced by PNSO

By |2024-07-19T08:36:02+01:00July 15th, 2024|PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Models|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur team members are delighted to announce a new dinosaur model from our chums PNSO.  A replica of Baryonyx walkeri is to be introduced.  It will be available from Everything Dinosaur in a few weeks.  A spokesperson from the UK-based mail order company commented that Maxim the Baryonyx was the latest theropod model to be manufactured by PNSO.

Maxim the Baryonyx

Wandering close to the water. An image of the new for 2024 Maxim the Baryonyx dinosaur model.

Maxim the Baryonyx

The Baryonyx figure measures twenty-four centimetres in length. It has an estimated head height of around nine centimetres. The dinosaur model has an articulated lower jaw. It comes with an A3 Sci-Art poster and a sixty-four-page, full-colour booklet. Everything Dinosaur customers will also receive a free Baryonyx walkeri fact sheet with purchases.

To view the extensive range of PNSO models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: PNSO Dinosaur Models.

Baryonyx walkeri was formally named and described in 1986 (Charig and Milner). The holotype (NHMUK PV R9951) is one of the most complete large theropod specimens known from Europe. The fossils also represent one of the most complete spinosaurid specimens known to science.

The new PNSO Baryonyx figure is supplied with an A3 Sci-Art poster and a full-colour, sixty-four page booklet.

The new PNSO Baryonyx figure is supplied with an A3 Sci-Art poster and a full-colour, sixty-four-page booklet.

Mike from Everything Dinosaur confirmed that the company would be stocking this new dinosaur model.  He praised the figure stating:

“Maxim the Baryonyx will make a welcome addition to the PNSO model range.  It is great to welcome a Baryonyx figure from PNSO, especially since the company added a Sinopliosaurus, a model of a probable Asian spinosaurid in 2022.”

An article on the Asian probable spinosaurid: Sinopliosaurus – Theropod or Pliosaur?

Maxim the Baryonyx with an articulated lower jaw.

The PNSO Baryonyx figure had an articulated lower jaw.  The long jaw has the typical shape of a member of the Spinosauridae family of dinosaurs.  Baryonyx is known to have fed on other dinosaurs, but most palaeontologists suspect that the bulk of its diet was fish.

Visit the award-winning and user friendly Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Toys.

14 07, 2024

The New Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor Model Features in a YouTube Short

By |2024-07-16T21:28:56+01:00July 14th, 2024|Beasts of the Mesozoic Models|0 Comments

Team members at Everything Dinosaur have made another YouTube short.  This video features the newly arrived Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor Model.  This articulated dromaeosaurid figure came into stock a few days ago.  It arrived on the same shipment as the Achillobator giganticus model.  Having made a YouTube short about the Beasts of the Mesozoic Achillobator, it seemed fitting to create another short video, but this time featuring Utahraptor ostrommaysi.

Video credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor Model

This is a beautiful, articulated dinosaur model.  It has twenty-three points of articulation and customers will be sent a free Utahraptor fact sheet with sales.  The Everything Dinosaur Utahraptor ostrommaysi fact sheet is shown in our YouTube short.  The Utahraptor model is in approximately 1:18 scale.  It measures an impressive thirty-eight centimetres long.  It is supplied with interchangeable feet and a transparent, adjustable display base.

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic articulated prehistoric animal figures in stock: Beasts of the Mesozoic Models.

A close-up view of the Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor model.

A close-up view of the stunning Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor figure. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

An Exquisite Replica of a Large Dromaeosaurid

The new for 2024 Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor is an exquisite model of a large dromaeosaurid dinosaur.  Mike from Everything Dinosaur explained that Utahraptor ostrommaysi was one of the biggest dromaeosaurs known to science.  The recently introduced Achillobator figure represents the largest dromaeosaurid known from Asia.

He commented:

“With the introduction of these replicas both representing very large dromaeosaurids, producing YouTube shorts about them feels like a juxtaposition.”

There are over two hundred and fifty videos and YouTube shorts on the Everything Dinosaur YouTube channel.

Visit: the YouTube channel of Everything Dinosaur and feel free to subscribe.

Beasts of the Mesozoic Achillobator and the Utahraptor figure.

Superb product packaging! The new Beasts of the Mesozoic Utahraptor model (top). The product packaging for the Achillobator giganticus figure is shown underneath. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Toys and Models.

13 07, 2024

The New PNSO Mateo the Tyrannotitan Model

By |2024-07-16T14:26:57+01:00July 13th, 2024|PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Models|0 Comments

A model of the South American carcharodontosaurid Tyrannotitan chubutensis is to be added to the PNSO mid-size range of prehistoric animal figures.  This new theropod figure will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in a few weeks.  PNSO have already produced a Giganotosaurus figure as well as a Mapusaurus. Phylogenetic studies suggest that the geologically much older Tyrannotitan was closely related to Giganotosaurus and Mapusaurus.  The new figure will be called Mateo the Tyrannotitan.

PNSO Tyrannotitan chubutensis model.

The new for 2024 PNSO Tyrannotitan chubutensis dinosaur model.  The figure is part of the PNSO mid-size range of prehistoric animal figures.

PNSO Mateo the Tyrannotitan

This new dinosaur figure measures thirty-two centimetres in length.  The head height is reported to be around thirteen centimetres.   The beautiful dinosaur model has an articulated lower jaw.  It is supplied with an A3 Sci-Art Tyrannotitan poster and a full-colour booklet.  The booklet has sixty pages.

PNSO Mateo the Tyrannotitan measurements.

The PNSO Tyrannotitan figure measures thirty-two cm long.

To view the range of PNSO models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: PNSO Prehistoric Animal Models.

Tyrannotitan chubutensis

Tyrannotitan (T. chubutensis) was formally named and described in 2005 (Novas et al). It was a large theropod, with body size estimates in excess of twelve metres. Body weight estimates also vary, Gregory S. Paul estimated seven tonnes, a body mass also supported by Larramendi and Rubén Molina-Pérez. Both cranial and postcranial remains are known. The fossils are associated with the Cerro Castaño Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation (Chubut Province, southern Argentina).

Tyrannotitan chubutensis has been classified as a member of the Giganotosaurini tribe within the Carcharodontosauridae family. As such, it is thought to be closely related to Giganotosaurus carolini and Mapusaurus roseae. Originally, thought to be a basal carcharodontosaurid subsequent studies (Canale et al) has redefined this enigmatic group of carnivorous dinosaurs and identified that these apex predators were highly diverse immediately prior to their extinction.

To read an article about another giant carcharodontosaurid (Meraxes gigas) : A New, Giant Carcharodontosaurid from Argentina.

The PNSO Tyrannotitan chubutensis model.

The Mateo the Tyrannotitan figure from PNSO has an articulated lower jaw.

This dinosaur is pronounced “Tie-ran-oh-tie-tan”.  Tyrannotitan chubutensis translates as the tyrant lizard of Chubut Province.

Tyrannotitan and Patagotitan

The discovery of Tyrannotitan cranial material has helped palaeontologists to better understand the morphology of carcharodontosaurid skulls.  For example, new size estimates were calculated for the total skull length of Giganotosaurus carolini.  In addition, scientists are slowly piecing together a trophic pyramid of the fauna associated with the Cerro Barcino Formation.  For example, fifty-seven Tyrannotitan teeth were found in association with the giant titanosaur Patagotitan.  The discovery of these teeth suggests that Tyrannotitan may have scavenged the bodies of these colossal dinosaurs.  It is also quite likely that Tyrannotitan hunted young, sick and old titanosaurs.  Although, it would have been a brave theropod to take on a healthy, fully-grown Patagotitan.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s 2017 blog post about the scientific description of Patagotitan mayorumGiant South American Dinosaur Gets a Name.

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Models and Toys.

12 07, 2024

A New Species of Early Tetrapod from the Lower Permian of Germany

By |2024-07-16T14:04:52+01:00July 12th, 2024|Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

Researchers have identified a new species of early tetrapod from the Lower Permian of Germany. It is a plant-eater, and it has been named Diadectes dreigleichenensis.  The fossils originate from the Bromacker locality in central Germany.  The ancient creatures from the Bromacker locality lived approximately 290 million years ago.  The site is helping palaeontologists to better understand the evolution of herbivory in early vertebrate ecosystems.

Diadectes dreigleichenensis skull material.

Fossil skull material showing the teeth in the jaws and palatal teeth rows. A new species of advanced reptiliomorph has been named (Diadectes dreigleichenensis). Picture credit: Carola Radke, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin.

Picture credit: Carola Radke, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin

Diadectes dreigleichenensis

The lower Permian Bromacker locality, situated in the UNESCO Global Geopark Thüringen Inselsberg – Drei Gleichen, central Germany, represents a unique inland fossil ecosystem that preserves a diverse early tetrapod fauna.  This palaeoenvironment is dominated by advanced reptiliomorphs, land animals that show a variety of amphibian as well as reptilian traits.  Lead author of the study, PhD student Jasper Ponstein (Museum für Naturkunde and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) explained that the research team examined skull and jaw material representing the Diadectomorpha.  The research has been published in the Royal Society Open Science.

The researchers used traditional examination techniques that involved carefully measuring the bones in the skull and jaws and comparing them to specimens in other collections.  In addition, CT scans were undertaken to reveal fine details obscured by matrix.  This research supports the identification of a third species of the group, representing a second species of the genus Diadectes, from Bromacker. This adds to the already diverse fauna of this herbivore-dominated ecosystem.

Since the 1990s palaeontologists have described fossil specimens belonging to the Diadectes genus from the Bromacker site. These specimens had all been assigned to a single species – Diadectes absitus.  Diadectes is a member of the Diadectidae family.  This family of reptilomorphs show both amphibian and amniote characteristics.  They evolved during the Early Carboniferous (Mississippian subperiod), and their fossils are known from America, Asia and Europe. These animals are typically, robust, heavily-built tetrapods.  They had strong, deep jawbones and molar-like teeth adapted to a diet of plants.

Diadectes dreigleichenensis fossi jaw.

Diadectes dreigleichenensis fossil jawbone shown in lateral view. The jaw is robust, and the molar-like teeth are adapted for the efficient grinding of plant material. Picture credit: Carola Radke, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin.

Picture credit: Carola Radke, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin

The Diadectomorpha include the earliest known herbivorous tetrapods, which evolved 305 million years ago in North America during the Late Carboniferous. Through the Late Carboniferous and much of the early Permian, herbivores remained a rare component of their respective ecosystem.

Abundant Early Herbivores

The Bromacker quarry is extremely significant.  It preserves evidence of the earliest ecosystem known in which herbivores were highly abundant.  Palaeontologists consider the Bromacker locality as the first modern ecosystem with a food chain that is recognisable today.  Herbivores make up the greatest proportion of vertebrates present.  In comparison, there are few secondary and apex predators.  The herbivore fossil record at this location includes numerous and exquisitely preserved skeletons of the diadectomorphs Diadectes absitus and Orobates pabsti, the pot-bellied caseid Martensius bromackerensis and the small agile lizard-like bolosaurid Eudibamus cursoris.

Jasper Ponstein outlined how the study was undertaken.  He stated:

“These skulls are preserved with the jaws firmly attached to the rest of the skull. Key features related to feeding, like the tooth row and the shape of the jaw joint, are obscured by the skull.  Through the CT-scans, we could actually reconstruct what these regions look like and compare the different specimens”.

The detailed study of the skull fossils revealed that diadectomorphs have a sinuous row of teeth on their lower jaws.  In addition, there are two rows of conical teeth located on the palate and a long blade-like process connected to the jaw joint.  The teeth in the lower jaw are widely spaced to maximise the available plant grinding surface. The blade-like process of the jaw joint probably played a role in helping to support the jaw whilst plant material was masticated. These adaptations allowed diadectomorphs to more effectively grind vegetation. Furthermore, the powerful CT images revealed a few replacement teeth within the palate. This suggests that diadectomorphs occasionally replaced their palatal teeth as well.

These observations enabled the research team to conclude that there was sufficient variation between the skulls to erect a new species – Diadectes dreigleichenensis.

Ponstein remarked:

“We named the species after UNESCO Global Geopark Thüringen Inselsberg – Drei Gleichen, which also contains the world-famous Bromacker locality. The species name is after Drei Gleichen, which means three of the same, in reference to the seemingly similar looking three diadectids from Bromacker, just like three iconic castles from the Middle Ages, each situated on a hilltop between Gotha and Erfurt within the Geopark.”

Co-author Professor Jörg Fröbisch (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) added:

“The ongoing Bromacker project is a prime example of an innovative and interdisciplinary research and science communication program, building on a multiple-decade-long international collaboration.”

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “A comprehensive phylogeny and revised taxonomy of Diadectomorpha with a discussion on the origin of tetrapod herbivory” by Ponstein, J., MacDougall, M.J., and Fröbisch, J. 2024 published in the Royal Society Open Science.

The award-winning Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Toys and Models.

11 07, 2024

New Achillobator Model YouTube Short

By |2024-07-15T20:25:54+01:00July 11th, 2024|Beasts of the Mesozoic Models|0 Comments

With the arrival of the new for 2024 Beasts of the Mesozoic Achillobator giganticus figure, team members at Everything Dinosaur took the opportunity to create a short video.  The very first series of these articulated dinosaur figures featured dromaeosaurids.  It is wonderful to see new members of the Dromaeosauridae added to this range.  Achillobator (A. giganticus) is the largest known dromaeosaur from Asia.  Our YouTube short highlights the figure, shows the packaging and mentions our free Achillobator fact sheet that is sent out to our customers.

Video credit: Everything Dinosaur

The video is under thirty seconds in length.  It begins with Mike from Everything Dinosaur sitting in the company’s huge warehouse surrounded by boxes of dinosaur models.  Views of the Achillobator and its packaging are provided.  This YouTube short concludes with Mike holding the free Achillobator giganticus fact sheet that is supplied with purchases.

Visit the Everything Dinosaur YouTube channel: Dinosaur Videos and Prehistoric Animal Model Reviews.

The Achillobator giganticus Figure

Scientifically described in 1999 (Perle et al), Achillobator represents the first and largest dromaeosaurid known from the Bayan Shireh Formation of Mongolia.  Not all the skeleton is known.  However, based on the holotype and subsequent fossil discoveries, this theropod measured around five metres in length.  It was robustly built and probably weighed in excess of three hundred kilograms.  That is heavier than a male Siberian tiger, one of the largest and most formidable terrestrial carnivores around today!

Achillobator giganticus scale drawing.

Everything Dinosaur has produced a scale drawing of the giant dromaeosaurid Achillobator giganticus. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic model range available from Everything Dinosaur: Beasts of the Mesozoic Models.

An Impressive Articulated Theropod Model

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Achillobator giganticus figure is articulated. It has twenty-three points of articulation, permitting the model to be displayed in a variety of poses. The Achillobator is supplied with interchangeable feet, a flexible tail and a display base. The Beasts of the Mesozoic Achillobator giganticus includes posing rod accessories and a clear, plastic display base. We were most impressed with the artwork on the packaging. The illustrations are stunning.

It measures thirty-eight centimetres in length (approximately fifteen inches). The model has a declared scale of 1:18.

Mike from Everything Dinosaur congratulated the design team and praised their efforts stating:

“The model is beautiful and extremely detailed.  The colour scheme for this Late Cretaceous predator model was inspired by the extant California condor.”

Visit the award-winning and easy to use Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Models and Toys.

10 07, 2024

Comptonatus chasei A New Dinosaur from the Isle of Wight

By |2024-07-14T13:39:06+01:00July 10th, 2024|Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

Researchers have named a new species of iguanodontian dinosaur from fossils found on the Isle of Wight.  The dinosaur has been named Comptonatus chasei.  The fossil material represents the most complete iguanodontian skeleton discovered in the Wealden Group for over a hundred years.  This new taxon has been erected based on numerous unique characteristics (autapomorphies) related to the skull, the straight dentary bone and a markedly expanded pubic hip bone described as being “the size of a dinner plate”.

Comptonatus chasei life reconstruction.

A view of the head of the newly described iguanodontian Comptonatus chasei. Picture credit: John Sibbick.

Comptonatus chasei

The fossil material is around 125 million years old (Barremian faunal stage). The dinosaur fossils was found in the cliffs of Compton Bay on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by fossil collector Nick Chase, before he tragically died of cancer.  Dr Jeremy Lockwood, helped with the excavation of the bones and teeth. He then spent years carefully comparing these fossils to other Wealden Group iguanodontians before he was confident that these fossils represented a new species.

Comptonatus chasei fossil location.

Dr Jeremy Lockwood walking on the beach in front of the cliffs that mark the excavation site. Picture credit: University of Portsmouth.

Dr Lockwood has become synonymous with Isle of Wight ornithopods along with Professor David Martill (University of Portsmouth) and Professor Susannah Maidment (London Natural History Museum).  These three scientists described Brighstoneus simmondsi, another Isle of Wight ornithopod in 2021.  The discovery of Comptonatus chasei demonstrates that these dinosaurs were particularly diverse during the Barremian to early Aptian faunal stages.

Three Isle of Wight iguanodontian dinosaurs.

Lateral views of the skulls of three taxa of Isle of Wight iguanodontian dinosaurs. Comptonatus chasei (A), Brighstoneus simmondsi (B) and Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis (C). Picture credit: University of Portsmouth.

Honouring the Late Nick Chase

A total of 149 fossil bones were collected.  The genus name translates as “Compton thunderer”.  This dinosaur was named after Compton Bay where the fossils were found and the “thunderer” element of the genus name relates to the large size of this dinosaur.   Bone histology indicates that the animal was around five or six years old when it died. It is estimated to have weighed around nine hundred kilograms.

The species name honours Nick Chase, winner of the Palaeontological Association’s Mary Anning Award in 2018, who made the initial discovery and through his lifetime contributed enormously to the collections at the Dinosaur Isle Museum on the Isle of Wight, and the Natural History Museum, London.

The late Nick Chase who found the fossil remains in 2013.

The late Nick Chase who found the fossil remains in 2013. The species name honours him, a winner of the Palaeontological Association’s Mary Anning Award in 2018, Nick Chase made the initial discovery. During his lifetime he contributed enormously to the study of the dinosaur biota of the Wessex Formation. Picture credit: University of Portsmouth.

Dr Lockwood commented:

“Nick had a phenomenal nose for finding dinosaur bones – he really was a modern-day Mary Anning. He collected fossils daily in all weathers and donated them to museums. I was hoping we’d spend our dotage collecting together as we were of similar ages, but sadly that wasn’t to be the case. Despite his many wonderful discoveries over the years, including the most complete Iguanodon skull ever found in Britain, this is the first dinosaur to be named after him.”

Comptonatus fossil excavation.

The Comptonatus chasei excavation in 2013. Nick Chase (in the foreground sketching), Steve Hutt (blue jumper), Jeremy Lockwood (wearing gloves), and Penny Newberry examining the exposed fossil material. Picture credit: University of Portsmouth.

Unique Autapomorphies

During the collection and initial preparation it was thought that these fossils represented a Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis. However, a detailed study identified several autapomorphies (unique characteristics) that led to the erection of a new taxon.

Dr Lockwood explained:

“I’ve been able to show this dinosaur is different because of certain unique features in its skull, teeth and other parts of its body. For example its lower jaw has a straight bottom edge, whereas most iguanodontians have a jaw that curves downwards. It also has a very large pubic hip bone, which is much bigger than other similar dinosaurs. It’s like a dinner plate!”

Comptonatus pubis bone.

The large pubis bone of Comptonatus pubis. The enlarged blade-like feature of the pubis is a unique characteristic that helped to define this new taxon. Picture credit: University of Portsmouth.

The scientists are uncertain as to why the pubic hip bone is so large. It could have been for muscle attachments indicating that this ornithopod had a different mode of locomotion. Perhaps it could have helped support the large stomach, or played a role in respiration.

The Geological Setting of Comptonatus chasei

Comptonatus chasei and Brighstoneus simmondsi fossils are associated with the Wessex Formation of the Wealden Group.  However, the deposits where Brighstoneous fossils have been found might be two million years older than the strata associated with C. chasei.  Conversely, Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis is geologically younger than Comptonatus.  Mantellisaurus fossils seem confined to the overlying Vectis Formation (Wealden Group).  This means that Comptonatus and Brighstoneus lived during the early Barremian faunal stage of the Cretaceous.  Mantellisaurus lived several million years later (late Barremian).

The scientists state that the Wessex Formation may have supported a greater diversity than previously realised, or that evolutionary and or migratory pressures resulted in faunal turnover. Comptonatus provides further evidence for a greater iguanodontian diversity and it is now unclear as to which iguanodontian taxon or taxa dominated the Wessex sub-basin during the Barremian.  In addition, the researchers postulate that a reassessment of ornithopod fossil material may be required, as with our improved understanding of the differences between these taxa, more new species might be identified.

Isle of Wight Dinosaur Taxa

Despite only four new dinosaur species being described on the Isle of Wight in the whole of the 20th century, there have been eight new species named in the last five years.  A remarkable number of new dinosaur taxa have been described from fossils found on the Isle of Wight. Ornithischians such as Vectidromeus insularis, Brighstoneus simmondsi and Vectipelta barretti have been named.

To read more about Vectidromeus insularisVectidromeus – A New Hypsilophodontid.

An article on Brighstoneus simmondsiA New Iguanodontid from the Isle of Wight.

Brighstoneus scale drawing

A scale drawing of the recently described Isle of Wight iguanodontian Brighstoneus.  CollectA added a model of Brighstoneus simmondsi to their CollectA Age of Dinosaur Popular range of figures.  Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A new, armoured dinosaur from the Isle of Wight described in 2023 (Vectipelta barretti): New Armoured Dinosaur Honours Natural History Museum Professor.

In addition, several theropod dinosaurs have been described including Vectiraptor greeni, Ceratosuchops inferodios and Riparovenator milnerae. Furthermore, there is evidence of a gigantic spinosaurid (the “white rock spinosaurid”). These discoveries suggest that the Wessex Formation supported a greater diversity of dinosaurs than previously realised. It could also indicate a substantial faunal turnover during the deposition of the Wessex Formation deposits.

Ancient relative of Velociraptor from “Dinosaur Isle”: Early Cretaceous Dromaeosaurid from the Isle of Wight.

To read about Ceratosuchops inferodios and Riparovenator milneraeTwo New Spinosaurids from the Isle of Wight.

News about the enormous “white rock spinosaurid”: Super-sized Carnivorous Dinosaur from the Isle of Wight.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the University of Portsmouth in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “Comptonatus chasei, a new iguanodontian dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Wessex Formation of the Isle of Wight, southern England” by Jeremy A. F. Lockwood, David M. Martill and Susannah C. R. Maidment published in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology.

The Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Models.

9 07, 2024

Everything Dinosaur Expands Its Product Range with Exciting New Arrivals

By |2024-07-09T17:35:32+01:00July 9th, 2024|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates|0 Comments

The team at Everything Dinosaur is brimming with excitement as our latest shipment of meticulously crafted “Beasts of the Mesozoic” dinosaur models has arrived! After weeks of anticipation, these scale model replicas of our favourite prehistoric giants are now taking up residence in our warehouse, ready to dispatch.

Sue from Everything Dinosaur is standing on the left. Surrounded by the newly arrived Beasts of the Mesozoic delivery.

Sue, our resident dinosaur expert, couldn’t contain her excitement as she was surrounded by the Everything Dinosaur’s latest additions – The new Beasts of the Mesozoic dinosaur models. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur. 

Sue is a Big Fan of the Beasts of the Mesozoic Models

“It’s always a thrill when a new batch of these Beasts of the Mesozoic articulated dinosaur models comes in,” said Sue, our resident dinosaur expert. “The attention to detail on these specimens is truly remarkable – from the vibrant use of colours to the precise features, each one is a work of art.”

To view the wider range of the Beasts of the Mesozoic models in stock:  Beasts of the Mesozoic Models.

As Sue and the rest of the Everything Dinosaur team carefully unwrapped and sorted the new models, time has been set aside in the company’s busy schedule to ensure that fulfilment orders could be dispatched promptly. Whilst wanting to get the products to customers quickly, don’t worry we will make sure that all parcels are packed carefully.

Mike from Everything Dinosaur is standing on the right, surrounded by parcels for customers ready to dispatch.

Mike getting surrounded by parcels that are ready to dispatch. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

“It’s not just about putting these Beasts of the Mesozoic dinosaurs into stock,” explained team member Mike. “We want our customers to feel like they’re stepping back in time when they see these models. That’s why we take such care in picking and packing orders.”

With the new models now in place, the Everything Dinosaur team is working hard to complete the fulfilment programme. Packages are being carefully packed, orders are being verified, and the team is buzzing with anticipation to share these awe-inspiring creatures with our loyal customers.

“This is what we live for,” said Sue, gazing up at the huge pile of parcels. “Bringing the magic of dinosaurs to life and sparking that sense of wonder in people. It’s going to be an incredible few months ahead with new models constantly coming our way!”

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Models and Gifts.

8 07, 2024

The Beautiful Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus Replica

By |2024-07-07T17:49:22+01:00July 8th, 2024|Nanmu Studio Models|0 Comments

Thank you to dinosaur model enthusiast Carl who sent into Everything Dinosaur some photographs of his recently acquired Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus model.  The most recent Giganotosaurus figures were introduced by Nanmu Studio in 2023.  They replaced the earlier Giganotosaurus “Behemoth” replicas.  Everything Dinosaur supplies both Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus figures (Gustav and Typhon) with display bases. Each of these figures is in approximately 1:35 scale.

Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus dinosaur model.

The Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus dinosaur model in the “Typhon” colour scheme. Picture credit: Carl.

Picture credit: Carl

The picture (above) shows the Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus “Typhon” on its display base. The model is shown in lateral view.  Both “Gustav” and “Typhon” measure around forty-four centimetres in length. When on the display base, the model’s head height is around nineteen centimetres.  The image shows the figure in front of the model’s beautiful packaging.

Mike from Everything Dinosaur thanked Carl for emailing the photographs of his dinosaur models.

To view the Nanmu Studio model range available from Everything Dinosaur: Nanmu Studio Models.

Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus Model

The Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus model is supplied with an Everything Dinosaur Giganotosaurus fact sheet. Carl sent several photographs of his new acquisition.  Everything Dinosaur has shared some of these images on social media.  One of the images showed the Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus compared with two Tyrannosaurus figures.

Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus compared to two Tyrannosaurus figures.

The Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus dinosaur model (left) compared to two Tyrannosaurus figures including the Rebor T. rex carcass bites the dust figure (plain colour scheme). Picture credit: Carl.

Picture credit: Carl

The picture (above) shows the Nanmu Studio Giganotosaurus (Typhon) on the left with the Nanmu Studio Tyrannosaurus rex model (Alpha) on the right.  The Rebor T. rex carcass bites the dust (plain colouration) is shown in the centre.

Mike commented:

“It is always a pleasure to receive emails from customers.  We enjoy looking at photographs of dinosaur model collections.  It is great to see the spectacular Giganotosaurus figure alongside models of tyrannosaurs.  These photographs highlight the beautiful paintwork and fine details of the prehistoric animal models.”

The Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

7 07, 2024

Nine New Species of Fossil Grapes Described

By |2024-07-07T16:30:09+01:00July 7th, 2024|Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

A newly published study led by scientists from the Field Museum in Chicago (USA) includes descriptions of nine new species of fossil grapes.  The paper, published in the journal “Nature Plants” reveals how the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs may have permitted grape vines to spread and diversify.  Some of the newly described grape taxa are the oldest found to date in the Western Hemisphere.  The fossils were found in Peru, Panama and Columbia and range in age from sixty million years old to around nineteen million years old.  The seeds range in geological age from the Palaeocene Epoch to the Miocene Epoch.

Fossil grapes.

Fossil grape (photograph top left) with computer model generated from CT fossil scans (top right). Line drawings illustrating the fossil by Pollyanna von Knorring (below). Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera.

Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera

Studying Fossil Grapes

These fossil seeds from Central and South America help to show how the grape family (Vitis) spread in the years following the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Lead author of the paper Fabiany Herrera (assistant curator of palaeobotany at the Field Museum in Chicago), commented:

“These are the oldest grapes ever found in this part of the world, and they’re a few million years younger than the oldest ones ever found on the other side of the planet.  This discovery is important because it shows that after the extinction of the dinosaurs, grapes really started to spread across the world.”

It is rare for fruits to be preserved in the fossil record.  However, seeds are more likely to survive the fossilisation process.  What palaeobotanists know about the evolution of angiosperms has been greatly enhanced by studying seeds and fossil pollen.  The earliest known grape seed fossils were found in India.  They are approximately sixty-six million years old.  At this time, there was a global extinction event.  This extinction was probably caused by the impact of an extra-terrestrial bolide.  This devastated life on Earth and led to a re-setting of ecosystems.  The composition of forests was altered as the extinction event affected both fauna and flora.

Nine species of fossil grapes identified. Researcher Fabiany Herrera holding a fossil specimen.

Fabiany Herrera in the field holding a grape fossil. Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera.

Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera

Dinosaur Extinction Helped Grape Growers

Herrera and his colleagues postulate that the extinction of the Dinosauria helped alter the flora within forests.

Co-author Mónica Carvalho explained:

“Large animals, such as dinosaurs, are known to alter their surrounding ecosystems. We think that if there were large dinosaurs roaming through the forest, they were likely knocking down trees, effectively maintaining forests more open than they are today.”

With the dinosaurs having died out and the absence of large mammals during the Palaeocene, forests became more crowded.  There were no large animals present to deplete the forest understorey and create a more open environment.  These new, dense forests provided an opportunity for plants like vines to become more widespread.  Ultimately, modern-day wine producers might have to thank dinosaurs for the evolution of the grape family of plants.

The diversification of mammals and birds may also have aided the spread of vines by helping to spread their seeds.

The Significance and Importance of Fossil Grapes

In 2013, Herrera’s PhD advisor and senior author of the new paper, Steven Manchester, published the paper describing the oldest known grape seed fossil from India.  Herrera suspected that ancient grape vines existed in South America too.

Herrera commented:

“Grapes have an extensive fossil record that starts about fifty million years ago.  I wanted to discover one in South America, but it was like looking for a needle in a haystack.  I’ve been looking for the oldest grape in the Western Hemisphere since I was an undergraduate student.”

Field work in the Colombian Andes with study co-author Mónica Carvalho provided the breakthrough.  Mónica discovered a fossilised grape seed.  The specimen was at least sixty million years old.  It was the first grape fossil to be found in South America.

Mónica Carvalho studying fossil grapes.

Mónica Carvalho excitedly holding a grape fossil. Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera.

Picture credit: Fabiany Herrera

A Tiny Fossil Seed

The fossil seed is extremely small. However, Herrera and Carvalho were able to identify it based on its particular shape, size, and other morphological features. CT scans were undertaken to examine the fossil’s internal structure and confirm its affinity with the grape family.  This new taxon was named Lithouva susmanii.  The binomial name translates as “Susman’s stone grape”.  The name honours Arther T. Susman a supporter of South American palaeobotany at the Field Museum.

Co-author Gregory Stull of the National Museum of Natural History (Washington DC) explained the significance of these fossil grapes:

 “This new species is also important because it supports a South American origin of the group in which the common grape vine Vitis evolved.”

The field studies in Central and South America led to the scientific description of nine new species of fossil grapes.  These fossilised seeds not only tell the story of grapes’ spread across the Western Hemisphere, but also of the many extinctions and dispersals the grape family has undergone. The fossils are only distant relatives of the grapes native to the Western Hemisphere and a few, like the two species of Leea identified are only found in the Eastern Hemisphere today.

A Tumultuous Evolutionary Journey

These fossils suggest that the evolutionary journey of the grape family has been tumultuous.  Herrera commented that the fossil record of grapes demonstrates that these plants are extremely resilient.

Given the mass extinction our planet is currently facing, Herrera commented that studies like this one are valuable because they reveal patterns about how biodiversity crises play out.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the Field Museum (Chicago) in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “Cenozoic seeds of Vitaceae reveal a deep history of extinction and dispersal in the Neotropics” by Fabiany Herrera, Mónica R. Carvalho, Gregory W. Stull, Carlos Jaramillo and Steven R. Manchester published in Nature Plants.

The Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

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