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23 02, 2024

Dinocephalosaurus and the Year of the Dragon

By | February 23rd, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

A team of scientists have described new specimens of Dinocephalosaurus orientalis a bizarre, Triassic marine reptile. First scientifically described in 2003 (Li Chun), this new study has permitted scientists to construct the enormous neck of this animal in detail.

Measuring up to five metres in length, Dinocephalosaurus orientalis had an extremely long and flexible neck. The neck contains a total of thirty-two vertebrae. Tanystropheus in contrast, had thirteen cervical vertebrae. In some specimens the neck is 1.7 metres in length. It is much longer than the animal’s torso. The researchers compare D. orientalis to the Tanystropheus taxon. Tanystropheus is known from the Middle Triassic of Europe and China. Whilst Tanystropheus and Dinocephalosaurus had similar body shapes, these reptiles were not closely related. The long necks seen in these two taxa are an example of convergent evolution.

Dinocephalosaurus orientalis life reconstruction.
Dinocephalosaurus orientalis swimming amongst some prehistoric fish known as Saurichthys. Picture credit: Marlene Donelly.

Dinocephalosaurus orientalis A Remarkable Marine Reptile

The scientific paper describing the animal is published in full in the academic journal Earth and Environmental Science: Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh – forming the entirety of the latest volume.

Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and Editor-in-Chief of the RSE’s academic journal Transactions, Professor Robert Ellam FRSE commented:

“This remarkable marine reptile is another example of the stunning fossils that continue to be discovered in China”.

Comparisons with Tanystropheus

Both reptiles were of similar size and have several features of the skull in common, including a fish-trap type of dentition. However, Dinocephalosaurus is unique in possessing several more vertebrae both in the neck and in the torso, giving the animal a much more snake-like appearance. The neck of Dinocephalosaurus was more flexible than the neck of Tanystropheus. The fossils analysed in the newly published paper come from the Guizhou Province of China.

Dinocephalosaurus orientalis fossil specimen.
A nearly complete and articulated specimen of Dinocephalosaurus orientalis. Picture credit: The Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Dr Nick Fraser FRSE, Keeper of Natural Sciences at National Museums Scotland stated:

“This discovery allows us to see this remarkable long-necked animal in full for the very first time. It is yet one more example of the weird and wonderful world of the Triassic that continues to baffle palaeontologists. We are certain that it will capture imaginations across the globe due to its striking appearance, reminiscent of the long and snake-like, mythical Chinese Dragon.”

Appropriate for the “Year of the Dragon”

As we have now entered the Chinese “Year of the Dragon”, a new scientific paper on a Chinese reptile that superficially resembled a mythical dragon is highly appropriate. The fossils were studied over a period of ten years by researchers from Scotland, China, America and Germany.

Professor Li Chun from the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology in China, the scientist who originally described Dinocephalosaurus orientalis said:

“This has been an international effort. Working together with colleagues from the United States of America, the United Kingdom and Europe, we used newly discovered specimens housed at the Chinese Academy of Sciences to build on our existing knowledge of this animal. Among all of the extraordinary finds we have made in the Triassic of Guizhou Province, Dinocephalosaurus probably stands out as the most remarkable.”

Scientists propose that Dinocephalosaurus was superbly adapted to its marine environment. Given the length of its neck, moving on land would have been difficult. A remarkable fossil described in 2017 revealed that Dinocephalosaurus was viviparous (live birth). This remains the only record of viviparity associated with the Archosauromorpha.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s blog post about this discovery: First Evidence of Live Birth in Ancient Dinosaur Relative.

Dinocephalosaurus orientalis – Significant Fossil Discoveries

Dr Stephan Spiekman, a postdoctoral researcher based at the Stuttgart State Museum of Natural History, commented:

“As an early-career researcher, it has been an incredible experience to contribute to these significant findings. We hope that our future research will help us understand more about the evolution of this group of animals, and particularly how the elongate neck functioned.”

The paper describing the animal is published in full in the academic journal Earth and Environmental Science: Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh – forming the entirety of the latest volume. The journal was first published in 1788.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of media releases from the Royal Society of Edinburgh and National Museums Scotland in the compilation of this article.

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

22 02, 2024

300 5-star Google Reviews for an Award-winning Company

By | February 22nd, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur has received 300 5-star Google reviews. Every Google reviewer to date has awarded the UK-based mail order company top marks. Earlier today, the company’s 300th Google review was posted up. Team members expressed their gratitude and stated that they were humbled by all the kind comments they had received.

300 5-star Google reviews
Confirmation that Everything Dinosaur has received three hundred Google reviews. Team members are grateful for all the feedback received. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Visit the award-winning and highly rated Everything Dinosaur website: The Everything Dinosaur Website.

300 5-star Google Reviews

The Everything Dinosaur website has thousands of customer reviews on it. In addition, the company has been working with Feefo for many years, gathering customer feedback and comments. It is estimated that Everything Dinosaur has received over 3,500 Feefo reviews.

The company was recently awarded Feefo’s highest accolade – the Platinum Trusted Service Award.

Platinum Trusted Service Award certificate.
The Platinum Trusted Service Award certificate given to Everything Dinosaur in recognition of the company’s outstanding customer service.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“Our thanks to all the wonderful people that have provided feedback. We read every single one and we respond to all those that require a reply. What with the website, Feefo and Google we have received thousands of 5-star reviews from customers.”

300 5-star Google reviews earned by Everything Dinosaur.
Everything Dinosaur has received three hundred Google reviews. Every reviewer has awarded Everything Dinosaur five stars. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Whether it is prehistoric animal figures, clothing or dinosaur soft toys, Everything Dinosaur has got it covered. The feedback from customers demonstrates the team’s commitment to service.

For dinosaur and prehistoric animal models: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models.

For prehistoric plush and dinosaur soft toys: Dinosaur Soft Toys.

Once again, our thanks for all the wonderful feedback that we have received.

21 02, 2024

New Schleich Stegosaurus (2024) Coming into Stock

By | February 21st, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

The new Schleich Stegosaurus (2024) dinosaur model is coming into stock at Everything Dinosaur. Team members took the opportunity to photograph this new Schleich figure at the Spielwarenmesse.

Schleich Stegosaurus (2024)
The new for 2024 Schleich Stegosaurus dinosaur model. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Schleich Stegosaurus (2024)

Schleich have chosen to give their new ornithischian figure an extremely scaly skin. Schleich prehistoric animal models are known for their tactile qualities. The design team have worked hard on creating the model’s texture. The elaborate, multi-layered plates on the back of the model are intriguing. However, we don’t think these plates are scientifically accurate.

Schleich Stegosaurus (2024)
The new for 2024 Schleich Stegosaurus dinosaur model shown in right lateral view. This photograph was taken at a recent trade show. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Schleich prehistoric animal figures currently in stock at Everything Dinosaur: Schleich Prehistoric Animal Figures.

Stegosaurus is Popular

Schleich have produced several versions of Stegosaurus over the years. This armoured dinosaur is extremely popular with children. It regularly appears in the top five of our surveys examining the popularity of prehistoric animals.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We are looking forward to receiving the new Schleich Stegosaurus. It will be stock at Everything Dinosaur very soon. The Stegosaurus joins the new for 2024 Schleich figures that are already in our warehouse. We expect the new colour version of the Schleich Brachiosaurus, the red Brachiosaurus model will arrive at the same time as the Schleich Stegosaurus.”

The new for 2024 Schleich Stegosaurus dinosaur model.
New for 2024 Schleich Stegosaurus model.

The Schleich Stegosaurus (2024) figure measures twenty centimetres in length. Those elaborate hip plates are around ten centimetres off the ground. This figure along with the Schleich red Brachiosaurus model will be in stock soon.

Visit the award-winning Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

17 02, 2024

The Popular Mojo Fun Woolly Rhinoceros Model

By | February 17th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur has received some new images of Mojo Fun prehistoric animal models. One of our favourites highlights the recently introduced Mojo Fun Woolly Rhinoceros. This replica of Coelodonta antiquitatis was introduced in 2023. The model has proved to be extremely popular with prehistoric animal model collectors.

Mojo Fun Woolly Rhinoceros model.
The popular and highly praised Mojo Fun Woolly Rhinoceros model.

To view the extensive range of Mojo Fun prehistoric animal figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Mojo Fun Prehistoric and Extinct Figures.

The Mojo Fun Woolly Rhinoceros Model

This Woolly Rhino model measures approximately 18 cm in length. Everything Dinosaur team members estimate its head height is around 7 cm. It is a stunning figure of a prehistoric mammal.

Mojo Fun Woolly Rhino model.
The new for 2023 Mojo Fun Woolly Rhino model is in stock. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur praised Mojo Fun for their excellent Woolly Rhino image and added:

“The Woolly Rhino is synonymous with the Ice Age. However, these magnificent animals were geographically widespread during the Pleistocene Epoch and thrived in grassland habitats.”

Visit the award-winning Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

16 02, 2024

Lungfish and the Remarkable History of Fossil Holes

By | February 16th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Animal News Stories, Main Page|0 Comments

Yesterday, Everything Dinosaur team members posted up an article that provided information on the evolutionary history of burrowing vertebrates. The first vertebrates to dig burrows were probably lungfish. These animals were similar to extant lungfish, animals such as Neoceratodus forsteri, the Australian lungfish. This taxon is also referred to as the Queensland lungfish.

Ironically, it is thought that this species of lungfish does not enter a dormant state (aestivation), by producing a mucous cocoon and burying itself in mud. Neoceratodus forsteri inhabits slow-moving rivers and reservoirs, primarily in south-eastern Queensland. In contrast, the African genus Protopterus does dig burrows. Protopterus is distantly related to the Australian lungfish. During the dry season when lakes tend to dry up, this fish excavates a burrow and buries itself in the mud. It enters a state of dormancy (aestivation), enabling it to survive whilst it waits for the water to return. During aestivation Protopterus is able to reduce its metabolism to 1/60th of its active state.

The Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri).
A stuffed specimen of an Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) on display at the London Natural History Museum. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A team of researchers, including scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin examined the origins and early evolution of vertebrate burrowing behaviour. Their paper was published in Earth-Science Reviews.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article about this new research: Digging into the History of Burrowing Vertebrates.

The Scientific Paper

The scientific paper comprises a short overview of convergent morphological and behavioural adaptations seen in modern fossorial taxa. The researchers also document the diversity of extant vertebrate burrows. In addition, the team reviews the fossil record of inferred vertebrate burrows and fossorial vertebrates from the Devonian to the Triassic. Results highlight a probable Devonian earliest occurrence of fossoriality in continental vertebrates (Dipnoi – lungfishes).

The earliest lungfish taxa were mostly marine animals. However, after the Carboniferous, lung fish fossils are confined to deposits laid down in freshwater environments.

The Australian lungfish specimen at the London Natural History Museum is displayed next to a model of a Protopterus burrow. This can confuse visitors, it was stated earlier in this article that not all lungfish exhibit this burrowing behaviour.

The award-winning Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

12 02, 2024

The CollectA Horseshoe Crab Model is Reviewed

By | February 12th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Animal News Stories, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

In 2020, CollectA introduced a Horseshoe crab model. These animals are members of the Limulidae family. This model of an ancient invertebrate is extremely detailed. The Horseshoe crab lineage has a fossil record that dates back to the Ordovician. Team members were asked to take some photographs of the figure for a palaeontology related project.

CollectA Horseshoe crab model in lateral view.
CollectA Horseshoe crab in lateral view. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The CollectA Horseshoe Crab Model

The model is very detailed, and the paint scheme makes this replica look extremely realistic. However, it is on the underside where the care and dedication of the design team really shows.

CollectA Horseshoe crab model in ventral view
The CollectA Horseshoe crab model in ventral view (view of the underside). Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the not-to-scale CollectA range of models available from Everything Dinosaur: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models.

The small chelicerae (modified claws) are bent towards the mouth. These appendages pass food into the mouth. The walking legs show the bifurcated end segments, and the rear “pusher” leg is clearly visible. The design team have included a vent at the base of the long, pointed telson.

Atlantic Horseshoe crab in ventral view.
An Atlantic Horseshoe crab in ventral view (view of the underside). Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture (above) shows an Atlantic Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) in ventral view. It is on display at the London Natural History Museum.

CollectA Horseshoe Crab model.
CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Size Horseshoe crab figure. The model measures 15 centimetres in length and the width of the carapace is 7.7 cm approximately.

In horseshoe crabs, the head and thorax are fused. This structure is called the prosoma. It is also sometimes referred to as the cephalothorax. The cephalothorax is covered in a hard, protective carapace.

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Take a Look at the Everything Dinosaur Website.

11 02, 2024

Mojo Fun Pays Tribute to Dinosaurs in the Movies

By | February 11th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Our thanks to Mojo Fun for sending Everything Dinosaur some new images of the Mojo Fun prehistoric life dinosaur models. The images we received includes a clever illustration of a Mojo Fun Tyrannosaurus rex model.

We think this T. rex dinosaur model was introduced into the Mojo Fun prehistoric and extinct range in 2020. It has certainly proved to be popular with dinosaur fans and model collectors. The manufacturer has paid tribute to dinosaurs in films by mimicking a famous scene from the “Jurassic Park/Jurassic World” franchise.

Mojo Fun Tyrannosaurus rex model in the spotlight.
Mojo Fun pays tribute to the “Jurassic Park/Jurassic World” franchise with this clever piece of artwork featuring a Mojo Fun T. rex model.

Mojo Fun Tyrannosaurus rex

The Mojo Fun T. rex figure is escaping from captivity. The image parodies scenes from the famous Universal Studio’s film franchise.

To view the Mojo Fun prehistoric life model range available from Everything Dinosaur: Mojo Fun Prehistoric Life Figures.

The Mojo Fun Tyrannosaurus rex Deluxe figure measures around 30 cm in length. Team members at Everything Dinosaur estimate its head height to be approximately 11 cm.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Every dinosaur fan will get the connection between the Mojo Fun T. rex image and the movies. There are rumours circulating that a new film in the “Jurassic Park/Jurassic World” franchise will be released in 2025. Mojo Fun’s timing of the release of this new image is apposite.”

Visit the award-winning Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

9 02, 2024

A Delightful Deinonychus Duo on Display at a Museum

By | February 9th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos|1 Comment

Team members at Everything Dinosaur took the opportunity to photograph the life-size Deinonychus replicas on display at the London Natural History Museum. These animated figures can be found in the Blue Zone of the Museum.

Visiting Deinonychus

Team members are not sure when the duo were installed in the Dinosaurs Gallery, but we estimate that these life-size replicas have been at the Museum for more than a decade.

Life-size Deinonychus replicas on display.
Life-size Deinonychus replicas on display at the London Natural History Museum. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Animated Deinonychus Dinosaur Models

The robotic armature permits these figures to move. The models can lift their heads, open their jaws and make a bow-like gesture to visitors. There is audio too. The Deinonychus replicas make a hissing sound. It reminds us of the sound a cat makes when it is frightened or being threatened.

The new for 2020 the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Deinonychus dinosaur model.
New for 2020 the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Deinonychus dinosaur model. A replica of this large dromaeosaurid.

The picture (above) illustrates Deinonychus. This model is from the Wild Safari Prehistoric World range of replicas.

To view this range: Wild Safari Prehistoric World Models at Everything Dinosaur.

Looking Out for the Animatronic Dinosaurs

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“There are lots of amazing exhibits at the London Natural History Museum. However, we always like to say hello to the pair of Deinonychus figures. A visit is not complete until we have spent a little time in their company.”

On the subject of a visit, take a look at the award-winning Everything Dinosaur website.

An award-winning and user-friendly dinosaur themed website: Everything Dinosaur.

8 02, 2024

Mojo Fun Repaints for 2024

By | February 8th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur team members had the opportunity to view the five new Mojo Fun repaints for 2024 at the recent Spielwarenmesse trade fair in Germany. The repainted dinosaur models will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur soon. The five figures include the Parasaurolophus (biped and quadruped stance), the Baryonyx, Troodon and a Stegosaurus.

Mojo Fun repaints.
The five repainted Mojo Fun dinosaur models for 2024. The standing Parasaurolophus (left) and the Parasaurolophus in the quadrupedal pose (mid left). The repainted Baryonyx is at the back and the Stegosaurus repaint is also at the back (back right). A pair of Troodon repaints can be seen (right). Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the extensive range of Mojo Fun figures in stock at Everything Dinosaur: Mojo Fun Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models.

Mojo Fun Repaints

Whilst there are new dinosaur models scheduled for 2025, the 2024 offering consists of five repainted figures. The Mojo Fun repaints for 2024 are listed below:

  • Standing Parasaurolophus.
  • Quadrupedal Parasaurolophus.
  • Stegosaurus.
  • Troodon with an articulated jaw.
  • Baryonyx with an articulated jaw.
Mojo Fun repaints - the 2024 Baryonyx dinosaur model.
The repainted Mojo Fun Baryonyx figure for 2024. This figure has a muted colour scheme compared to the original Mojo Fun Baryonyx. The articulated jaw has been retained. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We had the opportunity to see the new Mojo Fun repaints at the recent Spielwarenmesse in Germany. We were particularly impressed with the paint schemes. The Baryonyx and the Troodon figures are our personal favourites.”

The Everything Dinosaur website: The Everything Dinosaur Website.

5 02, 2024

University Student Discovers New Dinosaur Species

By | February 5th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

To discover a new dinosaur species might mark the high point of a long career in palaeontology for some scientists. However, for one Oklahoma State University (OSU) student they can already put a tick in the “named a new dinosaur box” on their curriculum vitae. Kyle Atkins-Weltman (PhD student in the School of Biomedical Sciences), was studying a selection of foot and leg bone fossils of what was thought to be a juvenile Anzu wyliei. Remarkably, analysis of the fossils indicated that these bones came from a mature animal and as such they represented a new dinosaur species. Based on these findings, Kyle was able to erect a new Hell Creek theropod – Eoneophron infernalis.

Eoneophron infernalis limb bones.
Limb bones of the newly described Hell Creek Formation caenagnathid Eoneophron infernalis. Picture credit: Kyle Atkins-Weldman.

The picture (above) shows limb bones from the newly described caenagnathid. Metatarsals (left) with the right tibia (centre) and a femur (right).

Pharaoh’s Dawn Chicken from Hell

Bone histology revealed the fossils to represent a dinosaur at least six years of age when it died. These were not the bones from a juvenile A. wyliei, but from a smaller but closely related theropod species. The student named the new dinosaur Eoneophron infernalis. It translates as “Pharaoh’s dawn chicken from Hell”. Team members at UK-based Everything Dinosaur pronounce this dinosaur as ee-on-oh-fron in-fur-nal-lis.

The name honours the description of the Anzu taxon as well as the student’s late beloved pet, a Nile monitor lizard named Pharaoh.

Student Kyle Atkins-Weltman.
Oklahoma State University PhD student Kyle Atkins-Weltman. Picture credit: Matt Barnard/OSU Centre for Health Sciences.

Eoneophron infernalis and Implications for Caenagnathid Diversity

Previously, only one caenagnathid (Anzu wyliei) was known from the Hell Creek Formation. It was formally named and described in 2014 (Lamanna et al). Palaeontologists were aware of smaller, fragmentary fossil bones representing caenagnathids from the Hell Creek Formation. It was unclear whether these fossils represented distinct, undescribed taxa or juvenile A. wyliei specimens. Eoneophron infernalis is estimated to have stood around one metre high at the hips and weighed approximately seventy kilograms. In contrast, Anzu wyliei was much larger, with a hip height of about 1.5 metres and weighing three hundred kilograms.

This new taxon is also distinct from other small caenagnathid material previously described from the area. Scientists postulate that there are potentially three distinct caenagnathid genera in the Hell Creek Formation. These results show that caenagnathid diversity in the Hell Creek ecosystem has probably been underestimated.

Caenagnathids of the Hell Creek Formation.
A life reconstruction of Eoneophron infernalis (left), an as yet, undescribed caenagnathid MOR 752 (bottom), and Anzu wyliei (right). Picture credit: Zubin Erik Dutta.

A Feathered Dinosaur

When asked to describe Eoneophron infernalis, Kyle highlighted how closely related to birds these dinosaurs were. He stated:

“It was a very bird-like dinosaur. It had a toothless beak and a relatively short tail. It’s hard to tell its diet because of the toothless beak. It definitely had feathers. It was covered in feathers and had wings.”

Co-author of the scientific paper and Kyle’s faculty advisor Associate Professor Eric Snively commented:

“Kyle is the first student researcher at OSU-CHS to reveal, describe and name a new dinosaur.”

When it looked like the fossils may not belong to an Anzu, Atkins-Weltman turned to caenagnathid researchers Greg Funston, PhD, a palaeontologist with the Royal Ontario Museum in Ontario, Canada, and palaeontology PhD candidate Jade Simons with the University of Toronto for their assistance.

He was also able to involve Associate Professor of Anatomy Dr Holly Woodward Ballard, an expert in bone histology.

A view of the metatarsal bones of Eoneophron infernalis.
A view of the metatarsal bones of Eoneophron infernalis. Picture credit: Kyle Atkins-Weldman.

A Thrilling Discovery

Kyle Atkins-Weltman explained that his project and published findings would not have been possible without his co-authors and those who assisted him.

He added:

“It was really thrilling. Based on the work and research I do, I never thought I would be someone to discover a new dinosaur species.”

Eoneophron infernalis life reconstruction.
Eoneophron infernalis life reconstruction. Picture credit: Zubin Erik Dutta.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from Oklahoma State University in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “A new oviraptorosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the end-Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation of North America” by Kyle L. Atkins-Weltman, D. Jade Simon, Holly N. Woodward, Gregory F. Funston and Eric Snively published in PLOS One.

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