All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.

Drawings of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals either done by team members or sent into Everything Dinosaur.

8 04, 2024

A Colourful Stegosaurus at Quince Tree Day Nursery

By |2024-04-10T09:32:36+01:00April 8th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Early Years Foundation Reception, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

At Everything Dinosaur, we get sent lots of pictures, photographs and artwork from dinosaur fans.  The budding young palaeontologists at Quince Tree Day Nursery (Essex), created a colourful classroom Stegosaurus and they were eager to show our dinosaur experts their armoured dinosaur illustration.  The Stegosaurus seems quite happy in its forest home.  As a plant-eater it would certainly have enough food to eat.  This Jurassic giant probably spent most of its time eating.  A fully-grown Stegosaurus was around nine metres long and it loved its greens.  Our dinosaur experts estimate that this herbivore would have eaten around ten kilograms of plants every day!

Quince Tree Day Nursery Stegosaurus.

The children and teachers at Quince Tree Day Nursery in Essex have created a super Stegosaurus. The nursery recently rated as “Outstanding” by Ofsted, have placed their Stegosaurus in a forest, We are sure this plant-eater will be happy with so many plants to eat. Picture credit: Quince Tree Day Nursery.

Picture credit: Quince Tree Day Nursery

Dinosaur Artwork on Display at Quince Tree Day Nursery

The children and teachers at the day nursery have added plates to the back of their Stegosaurus.  In addition, the dinosaur has plates on his neck and around his head.  Quince Tree Day Nursery provides care for children from six weeks to five years of age. The dedicated staff work hard to create a supportive and nurturing environment for the children.  Many youngsters obsess on the Dinosauria, and we often amazed by their knowledge when we get to meet them.

A recent Ofsted inspection of Quince Tree Day Nursery (January 2024) rated this nursery as “Outstanding”.

Stegosaurus lived in the Late Jurassic.  The world looked very different compared to today.  For example, flowering plants had probably not evolved.  However, Stegosaurus would have eaten plants that you can still see today, plants like horsetails.

Horsetails

Stegosaurus lived in a world with very few (if any) flowers.  It munched on horsetails and other plants.  Horsetails (Equisetum) continue to thrive as they are able to grow in areas where other plants would find it difficult to get a foothold. Often regarded as weeds, these tough little plants are essentially living fossils as the earliest examples of the genus Equisetum date from the Early Jurassic of South America. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur congratulated the teachers and children at the nursery for the stunning Stegosaurus artwork.

Our thanks to Rachael for sending into us the delightful photograph.

For a further information on Stegosaurus and free Stegosaurus drawing materials: Contact Everything Dinosaur.

30 03, 2024

CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus Features in Science News Story

By |2024-03-27T08:49:08+00:00March 30th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

A new species of Late Jurassic iguanodontian was recently announced. Hesperonyx martinhotomasorum from the Lourinhã Formation of western Portugal demonstrates that this part of Europe was home to a highly diverse dinosaur dominated ecosystem. Everything Dinosaur corresponded with the scientific paper’s lead author Filippo Maria Rotatori (Universidade NOVA de Lisboa) so that we could obtain the media release about this exciting dinosaur discovery. We spotted a CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus in one of the photographs submitted.

One of the paper’s co-authors and the supervisor of Filippo, Miguel Moreno-Azanza was photographed with a titanosaur egg fossil and a CollectA Ampelosaurus figure.

Hesperonyx martinhotomasorum paper co-author Miguel Moreno-Azanza, from Zaragoza University

Miguel Moreno-Azanza, from Zaragoza University, co-author of the Hesperonyx scientific paper with a titanosaur egg fossil and an Ampelosaurus model. The CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus features in this image.  Picture credit: Universidade NOVA de Lisboa.

The CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus

Postdoctoral Fellow Miguel Moreno-Azanza is an authority on fossilised eggs and fossil eggshells. A photograph submitted with the Hesperonyx media release includes the CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus and a specimen of a titanosaur egg.  Team members presume the CollectA model was included in the image to demonstrate what a titanosaur looks like.  When visiting preparation laboratories and museums we do tend to see lots of prehistoric animal models including figures from the CollectA Prehistoric Life range.

CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus model.

The CollectA Prehistoric Life Ampelosaurus model was introduced in 2012.

The CollectA Ampelosaurus figure was introduced in 2012.  It was designed by Anthony Beeson.  This titanosauria sauropod was formally named and described in 1995 (Ampelosaurus atacis).  Fossils come from outcrops of the lower levels of the Marnes Rouges Inférieures Formation in the French Pyrenees. Ampelosaurus is estimated to have measured around fourteen to sixteen metres in length. It may have weighed fifteen tonnes. Although much larger than any extant terrestrial animal, Ampelosaurus was relatively small compared to other Late Cretaceous titanosaurs.

During the Late Cretaceous sea levels were extremely high. Much of the European landmass was submerged. Ampelosaurus lived on the Ibero-Armorican island, a large island made up of southern France and the Iberian Peninsula. Ampelosaurus fossil material is associated with the early Maastrichtian faunal stage of the Late Cretaceous. It lived approximately 71-70 million years ago. The genus name translates as “vine lizard”. Some of the first fossils to be studied were discovered close to the Blanquette de Limoux vineyard. This part of the French Pyrenees is renowned for its fine sparkling wine.

To view the range of CollectA Prehistoric Life figures in stock at Everything Dinosaur: CollectA Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models.

Ampelosaurus scale drawing.

A typical European titanosaur (Ampelosaurus atacis) from the Late Cretaceous. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Spotting the Ampelosaurus Model

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented that many academics, palaeontologists and scientists source their models from Everything Dinosaur.  Many collect figures including the CollectA Prehistoric Life model range.  However, these models are also used in science communication projects.

The spokesperson added:

“When discussing titanosaur eggs and other titanosaur fossil material it is helpful to have a titanosaur dinosaur model on hand.  Members of the public can get an impression of what the dinosaur looked like.”

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: The Everything Dinosaur Website.

To read the article about the discovery of the new European iguanodontian dinosaur: A New Iguanodontian Dinosaur from Western Portugal.

What other prehistoric animal models will be spot in future media releases?

17 03, 2024

New Royal Mail Mary Anning Stamps

By |2024-03-21T15:41:21+00:00March 17th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Royal Mail intend to introduce a set of Mary Anning stamps. The set of four stamps feature a portrait of the pioneering palaeontologist and three fossil finds. The stamps have been launched at the same time as a set of prehistoric animal stamps.

The Royal Mail Mary Anning stamps can be purchased individually or as a special presentation set for collectors.

Royal Mail Mary Anning stamps.
Four Royal Mail stamps produced in collaboration with the Natural History Museum of London commemorate the contribution to the nascent science of palaeontology made by the amateur fossil collector Mary Anning (1799-1847). Picture credit: Royal Mail.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s recent article about the Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps: Royal Mail Introduces Prehistoric Animal Stamps.

Ichthyosaurus communis and Other Significant Fossils

One of the stamps illustrating fossil discoveries features Ichthyosaurus communis. This was the first species within the Ichthyosaurus genus to be erected (De la Beche and Conybeare, 1822).

An Ichthyosaurus model
The Ichthyosaurus model (Wild Safari Prehistoric World) ready to take its turn on the Everything Dinosaur turntable. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The image (above) shows a typical replica of an ichthyosaur. This marine reptile was a sleek and agile predator with a body shape similar to that of extant dolphins. The dolphin/ichthyosaur body morphology is often cited as an example of convergent evolution.

The model is from the Wild Safari Prehistoric World range.

To view this range: Models of Prehistoric Animals.

From the Lower Jurassic

The stamps feature three prehistoric animals connected to Mary Anning. Ichthyosaurus communis (top) a complete fossilised juvenile, purchased from Mary Anning circa 1835. Dapedium politum a species of ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii) collected by Mary Anning circa 1829 (middle). Plesiosaurus macrocephalus (bottom), a near-complete, articulated juvenile collected by Mary Anning in 1830.

Stamps celebrating the discoveries of Mary Anning.
The stamps feature three prehistoric animals connected to Mary Anning. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

A Portrait of Mary Anning

The set of stamps also includes a portrait of Mary Anning. The date of the painting remains unknown, but it has been suggested that it was painted before 1842. It is housed at the Natural History Museum (London). Unfortunately, the name of the artist who created this portrait of Mary in her best clothes was not recorded.

A portrait of Mary Anning part of a Royal Mail stamp collection.
A portrait of Mary Anning. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It is wonderful to see Royal Mail recognising the contribution to palaeontology and geology by Mary Anning. We hope these beautiful Mary Anning stamps and the presentation set will spark an interest in the Earth sciences.”

The Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Toys and Models.

14 03, 2024

New Magazine Front Cover Art

By |2024-03-20T10:57:47+00:00March 14th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page, Prehistoric Times|0 Comments

Our thanks to editor Mike Fredericks who sent to Everything Dinosaur the artwork for the next edition of “Prehistoric Times” magazine. This quarterly magazine is famed for its beautiful cover art. Many noteworthy palaeoartists have contributed over the years. The front cover artwork for issue 149 is no exception. The illustration featuring Styracosaurus albertensis is stunning!

We look forward to reading about the artist behind this remarkable image when issue 149 arrives.

The front cover artwork for "Prehistoric Times" issue 149.
The front cover artwork for “Prehistoric Times” issue 149 (Spring 2024).

Picture credit: Mike Fredericks

“Prehistoric Times” Magazine

The spring issue (149) will feature an in-depth interview with palaeontologist Jordan Mallon. Dr Mallon is based at the Canadian Museum of Nature (Ottawa, Canada). He specialises in studying dinosaur ecology and has been involved in the naming and scientific description of several fossil species, including a horned dinosaur – Spiclypeus shipporum. Although both members of the Ceratopsia clade and contemporary, Styracosaurus and Spiclypeus were not closely related. The centrosaurine Styracosaurus albertensis is known from the Dinosaur Provincial Park Formation of Alberta, (Canada). In contrast, the chasmosaurine Spiclypeus shipporum is known from the Judith River Formation of Montana (United States).

Beasts of the Mesozoic Spiclypeus shipporum.
A replica of the horned dinosaur named by Mallon et al (2016). The Beasts of the Mesozoic Spiclypeus shipporum in lateral view.

The model (above) is the articulated Spiclypeus shipporum in the Beasts of the Mesozoic series.

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic model range: Beasts of the Mesozoic Prehistoric Animal Models.

The Pterosaur Tapejara

The other prehistoric animal to be featured in the spring edition is the pterosaur Tapejara. Readers can expect a comprehensive profile of this Early Cretaceous flying reptile. Tapejara is famed for its huge head crest. We are looking forward to viewing all the reader submitted artwork illustrating this spectacular member of the Pterosauria.

In addition, details will be provided of new books chronicling the life and work of the influential Czech artist Zdeněk Burian. Issue 149 will also feature the latest instalment of the excellent series penned by Jon Lavas discussing the artwork of Burian.

The work of English palaeoartist Bob Nicholls is also featured. Bob illustrated the wonderful “Dinosaur Behavior” which was launched late last year. This excellent dinosaur book was written by Professor Mike Benton (University of Bristol). Published by Princeton University Press “Dinosaur Behavior” is a beautifully illustrated and highly informative guide to the Dinosauria.

"Dinosaur Behavior" front cover.
The front cover of the recently launched dinosaur book “Dinosaur Behavior” by Professor Michael J. Benton and illustrated by Bob Nicholls. It will feature in issue 149 of “Prehistoric Times” magazine. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Spring Issue of “Prehistoric Times” Coming Soon

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur explained that they were looking forward to reading the next edition of “Prehistoric Times”.

The spokesperson added:

“This magazine is an institution! It contains well-written articles featuring leading academics and scientists along with fabulous profiles of prehistoric animals and updates on fossil discoveries as well as model collecting. The artwork submitted by readers is amazing!”

To learn more about “Prehistoric Times” magazine and to subscribe: “Prehistoric Times” Magazine.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s blog post from May 2020 about the scientific description of Spiclypeus shipporum: New Spiked-shield Horned Dinosaur from Montana.

12 03, 2024

New Royal Mail Prehistoric Animal Stamps

By |2024-03-21T10:02:24+00:00March 12th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

A beautiful set of Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps is being introduced. The main set will feature prehistoric animals including Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops and Stegosaurus. A second set of stamps is also going on sale commemorating the life and works of Mary Anning.

Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps (2024).
The eight main stamps feature beautiful illustrations of prehistoric animals by the Exeter-based digital concept illustrator Joshua Dunlop. Six dinosaurs are featured along with a pterosaur (Coloborhynchus) and a plesiosaur (Cryptoclidus). Picture credit: Royal Mail.

Celebrating Two Hundred Years Since the Formal Description of Megalosaurus

2024 marks the two hundredth anniversary of the formal, scientific description of a prehistoric animal that was later to be classified as a dinosaur. The theropod dinosaur Megalosaurus was named and described in 1824 by the Reverend William Buckland who was president of the Geological Society of London. The binomial species name Megalosaurus bucklandii was erected in 1827. This was the first scientific account in the western world of a dinosaur. Megalosaurus features on a pair of stamps along with the roughly contemporaneous marine reptile Cryptoclidus.

Royal Mail Prehistoric Animal Stamps (Megalosaurus and Cryptoclidus).
The fourth pair of stamps feature a Megalosaurus encountering a plesiosaur (Cryptoclidus) whilst wading through shallow water. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

Megalosaurus was for a long time a taxonomic waste basket. Theropod fossils from different strata were assigned to this taxon. The only definitive Megalosaurus remains come from Oxfordshire (England).

The PNSO Megalosaurus model.
A model of Megalosaurus bucklandii. The new for 2023 PNSO Megalosaurus dinosaur model. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture (above) shows a model of Megalosaurus bucklandii from PNSO.

To view the PNSO range of prehistoric animal figures: PNSO Prehistoric Animal Models and Figures.

Royal Mail Prehistoric Animal Stamps

The eight prehistoric animal stamps were created by Joshua Dunlop, a digital concept artist based in Exeter (Devon). A second set of stamps features a portrait of the pioneering fossil collector Mary Anning. In addition, three stamps have been created that show photographs of fossils associated with Mary Anning and the Lower Jurassic rocks of Lyme Regis.

The list of dinosaurs featured:

  • Tyrannosaurus
  • Triceratops
  • Stegosaurus
  • Diplodocus
  • Iguanodon
  • Megalosaurus
Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps (Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops).
Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus feature on the new for 2024 Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps. Only the genus name for Tyrannosaurus is given on the stamps and in the accompanying Royal Mail press release. We suspect that this is an illustration of Tyrannosaurus rex. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

In Collaboration with the London Natural History Museum

The Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps were created in collaboration with the London Natural History Museum.

Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps (Stegosaurus and Diplodocus).
Diplodocus and Stegosaurus feature on the Royal Mail £2 stamps. These animals are known from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the United States. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

North American dinosaurs are featured (Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, Stegosaurus and Diplodocus). Prehistoric animals known from fossil discoveries from southern England are also included. Each pair of stamps show a similar image but from a different prehistoric animal’s perspective. For example, one pair of stamps depicts a herd of Iguanodon escaping a forest fire whilst a flock of startled pterosaurs (Coloborhynchus) fly overhead.

Royal Mail prehistoric animal stamps (Coloborhynchus and Iguanodon).
One of the largest toothed pterosaurs known to science is featured on a stamp (Coloborhynchus). It accompanies an Iguanodon stamp. Both these prehistoric animals are known from the Lower Cretaceous of England. Picture credit: Royal Mail.

Everything Dinosaur Comments

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“These are beautiful stamps. The eight prehistoric animal stamps show four different scenes, and they are designed to be viewed as pairs. For instance, the Tyrannosaurus stamp shows this theropod attacking a Triceratops. In contrast, the Triceratops stamp shows the horned dinosaur fending off a lunge from the Tyrannosaurus.”

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Dinosaur Toys, Models and Dinosaur Clothing.

28 02, 2024

New “Prehistoric Times” Issue 148 Reviewed

By |2024-03-28T16:45:35+00:00February 28th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page, Prehistoric Times|0 Comments

Issue 148 of “Prehistoric Times” magazine is jam-packed with interesting articles, amazing drawings and fascinating features.  Fans of human evolution are treated to a personal tour of some of the exhibits on display at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany).  Our guide Dr Andreas Forrer visits the site where the first Homo neanderthalensis bones were found in 1856. Dr Forrer brings us up to date on genetic research that might lead to the generation of Neanderthal tissue in a laboratory.  These cells would be used to research into the development of the human immune system.

The front cover artwork for issue 148 was supplied by Jaime Chirios.  A herd of titanosaurs (Saltasaurus australis) is being pursued by a pack of abelisaurids (Quilmesaurus curriei).  It is a most dramatic prehistoric scene.  The complete illustration can be found inside the magazine along with another stunning piece of art from Jaime Chirios depicting Carcharodontosaurus feeding.

"Prehistoric Times" winter edition 2024.

The front cover of “Prehistoric Times” features a thrilling encounter between a pair of theropods and a herd of sauropods. Picture credit: Mike Fredericks/Jaime Chirios.

Zdeněk Burian and Sparassodonts

Jon Lavas continues his series highlighting the contribution to palaeoart made by Zdeněk Burian.  Prehistoric mammals have been the focus of recent articles and in issue 148 he looks at the enigmatic Sparassodonts, (Sparassodonta).  These carnivorous mammals were related to marsupials and as Lavas points out, they are not often featured in prehistoric art.  On the subject of art, famous palaeoartist Jon Sibbick wrote to the magazine editor confirming that after a long and illustrious career, he would not be undertaking any more commercial projects.

There is a lot of reader submitted artwork throughout the magazine including some delightful illustrations of prehistoric animals from Asbury Park High School pupils.  The photograph of the artwork laid out on the floor reminded us of the many hundreds of dinosaur illustrations we received when Everything Dinosaur team members worked in schools.

Dinosaur drawings.

Dinosaur drawings presented to Everything Dinosaur from schoolchildren. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Ambulocetus and Australovenator

Phil Hore provides the text for the articles on the two featured prehistoric animals Ambulocetus and Australovenator.  There are some marvellous reader submitted artwork on the ancestor of whales.  Congratulations to Anders Bang, Giovanni De Benedictis and Nick Papadimitriou. Tim Bollinger provides an Australovenator in lateral view, whilst Ethan Martinicky illustrates a pair in the rain with a pterosaur in close attendance.   Kevin Hedgpeth chose to draw an Australovenator skull, and it is a splendid illustration.

Tracy Lee Ford continues his series looking at the skin of sauropods and regular contributor Randy Knol looks at models of prehistoric animals from the Permian and highlights some of the smaller figures from PNSO.  He also discusses marine reptile figures with a focus on some CollectA marine reptiles.  Editor Mike Fredericks brings us news of new CollectA and Safari model releases including the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Utahraptor that recently arrived at Everything Dinosaur.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Utahraptor dinosaur model unpacked in the Everything Dinosaur warehouse.

Unpacking the new Wild Safari Prehistoric World Utahraptor dinosaur model.   Editor Mike Fredericks features this figure in his “What’s new in Review” feature.  Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

The sad passing of Dr Martin G. Lockley is noted, and our sympathies go out to his colleagues, family and friends.

I Found a Dinosaur Egg

Kenneth Carpenter (University of Colorado Museum of Natural History) provides an identification guide to dinosaur eggs.  He comments upon the numerous times he has been presented with an abraded pebble by a member of the public who is convinced that they have found a dinosaur egg.

This happens to Everything Dinosaur team members too.  We get sent images of all kinds of rounded objects and we patiently explain that this is a concretion, a nodule or something similar.  We do our best not to disappoint the finder and for fans of prehistoric animals you will not be disappointed with the extensive “Paleonews” section in the magazine.  Recent news stories about dinosaurs living in burrows, mosasaurs from Morocco and megaraptorids from Australia are covered.  The huge Dorset pliosaur skull that was the subject of a recent television documentary narrated by Sir David Attenborough is also featured.

Take a look at the article on the Naturalis Biodiversity Center (Leiden, Netherlands) by Paul McFarland.  There are some fabulous photographs of prehistoric animal skeletons on display.

Thanks to artist Fabio Pastori for his wonderful illustrations.  It was also a treat to view some more artwork from Ely Kish included in the magazine.

Our congratulations to all involved in “Prehistoric Times” magazine issue 148.  As always, this quarterly magazine is crammed full of amazing artwork and fascinating features.

For more information about “Prehistoric Times” magazine and to subscribe: “Prehistoric Times” Magazine.

26 02, 2024

Creating a New Tlatolophus Scale Drawing

By |2024-03-17T09:28:37+00:00February 26th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur has commissioned a Tlatolophus galorum scale drawing. It will be used on a fact sheet being created that will be sent out with sales of Tlatolophus models. The fact sheet is being prepared as the Haolonggood Tlatolophus figures are due to arrive soon.

Tlatolophus galorum scale drawing.
A scale drawing of the lambeosaurine dinosaur Tlatolophus galorum. This duck-billed dinosaur is estimated to have grown to a length of around eight metres. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Tlatolophus galorum

A beautifully preserved and semi-articulated hadrosaur tail was excavated from Campanian-aged deposits of the Cerro del Pueblo Formation (Coahuila, Mexico). Fieldwork revealed extensive fossil material and this duck-billed dinosaur was formally named and described in 2021 (Ramírez-Velasco et al).

To read Everything Dinosaur’s blog article from 2021 about the scientific description of T. galorum: Tlatolophus galorum A New Lambeosaurine from Mexico.

Haolonggood Tlatolophus dinosaur model (An Dao Quan).
The Haolonggood Tlatolophus dinosaur model (An Dao Quan). It is one of two Tlatolophus galorum models in the Haolonggood dinosaur model range.

To view the range of Haolonggood models available from Everything Dinosaur: Haolonggood Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models.

What’s in a Name?

The genus name Tlatolophus is pronounced Tlat-to-lo-fus.

This name is derived from a local dialect (Náhuatl), and it translates as “word”. In addition, the genus name uses the Greek lophos “crest”. The etymology relates to this dinosaur’s head crest being similar to a symbol in the Aztec culture resembling an inverse comma that means “word”.

The species or trivial name honours the philanthropist Jesús Garza Arocha and recognises the assistance of the López family, who helped the palaeontologists by providing food and accommodation during the field seasons.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We will complete the Tlatolophus galorum fact sheet shortly. It will be ready for the arrival of the Haolonggood figures which are expected in about twenty days or so.”

Visit the website of Everything Dinosaur: Everything Dinosaur.

10 02, 2024

Getting to Grips with the Enigmatic Caenagnathidae

By |2024-02-07T10:13:48+00:00February 10th, 2024|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

With the publication of the scientific paper announcing the discovery of Eoneophron infernalis, we at Everything Dinosaur thought we would take a closer look at the Caenagnathidae. The Caenagnathidae family (pronounced seen-nag-nay-thid-ay), are part of the Oviraptorosauria clade of maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs. They are closely related to the oviraptorids (Oviraptoridae family).

Anzu wyliei scale drawing.
A scale drawing of a dinosaur (Anzu wyliei). This dinosaur is a member of the Caenagnathidae family, and its fossils come from the Hell Creek Formation (Maastrichtian faunal stage of the Late Cretaceous). Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To read the recent article about Eoneophron infernalis: University Student Discovers New Dinosaur Species.

Defining the Maniraptora and the Oviraptorosauria

The Maniraptora clade consists of coelurosaurian dinosaurs and is defined as including the birds and the non-avian dinosaurs more closely related to them than to Ornithomimus velox. As well as containing the Oviraptorosauria, this clade also includes several other groups such as the dromaeosaurids, the Troodontidae family and the therizinosaurs.

The Oviraptorosauria clade* is comprised of the Caudipteridae family and two closely related dinosaur families the Caenagnathidae and the Oviraptoridae that together are classified as the Caenagnathoidea. The Oviraptorosauria are united by having very bird-like skeletons, with highly pneumatised bones. In addition, the rostrum is very short, and these dinosaurs have beaks. The beak is often, but not always edentulous (no teeth). These dinosaurs were all probably feathered.

A model of an Oviraptor.
An Oviraptor dinosaur model (CollectA Age of Dinosaurs).

The image (above) depicts an Oviraptor model from the CollectA Age of Dinosaurs range.

To view this range of prehistoric animal figures: CollectA Age of Dinosaurs/Prehistoric Life Models.

The Caenagnathidae Family and Eoneophron infernalis

The family Caenagnathidae, together with its closely related sister family the Oviraptoridae, comprises the superfamily Caenagnathoidea. Virtually all known members of this superfamily are confined to the Late Cretaceous. Taxonomically the Caenagnathidae is defined as Chirostenotes pergracilis and all other theropods more closely related to it than they are to Oviraptor philoceratops.

Most of these dinosaurs tend to be quite small. As a result, they are probably underrepresented in the fossil record. For example, Anzu wyliei was thought until recently to be the only caenagnathid from the Hell Creek Formation. However, there are probably at least three caenagnathids present in Hell Creek strata, including the recently named Eoneophron infernalis.

Eoneophron infernalis limb bones
The femur (left) and right tibia (right) of Eoneophron. Picture credit: Kyle Atkins-Weldman.

Caenagnathids Not Closely Related to Ostriches

The Caenagnathidae family was originally erected by Raymond Martin Sternberg (1940), the son of the pioneering palaeontologist Charles Mortram Sternberg. Raymond Martin Sternberg thought that these dinosaurs were flightless birds. He erected the Caenagnathidae family which translates as “recent jaws”. It was mistakenly thought that these theropods were closely related to the Palaeognathae “old jaws” bird family. Extant palaeognath birds include the flightless Kiwi, the Ostrich and the Rhea as well as volant forms such as Tinamou birds. It is now known that the Caenagnathidae family of non-avian dinosaurs are not closely related to palaeognaths.

Caenagnathids are confined to the Late Cretaceous of Asia and North America. They tend to have small heads, long necks and short tails.

Time-calibrated Oviraptorosauria clade consensus tree showing the position of Eoneophron infernalis. Picture credit: Atkins-Weltman et al.

Challenging Phylogenetic Assessment

Whilst the fragmentary nature of most caenagnathid specimens makes phylogenetic assessment challenging, in the recent Eoneophron infernalis paper the researchers undertook a time-calibrated phylogenetic analysis of the Oviraptorosauria. Eoneophron was placed as a sister taxon to Citipes elegans and Elmisaurus rarus.

The difficulties involved in classifying oviraptorosaurs is exemplified by this placement. Although skeletal similarities between these three dinosaurs exist, there is a lack of comparable fossil material to study. Citipes elegans is geologically older. Its fossils come from the Dinosaur Provincial Park Formation of Alberta (Campanian faunal stage of the Late Cretaceous). In contrast, Elmisaurus rarus probably predates Eoneophron infernalis by a couple of million years. It too is from the Maastrichtian faunal stage of the Cretaceous. However, E. rarus fossils come from the Nemegt Formation of Mongolia.

A revision of already described specimens coupled with improved fossil sampling should help palaeontologists to gain a better understanding of the taxonomy of the Oviraptorosauria and specifically the enigmatic Caenagnathidae.

The Oviraptorosauria clade* also includes some other theropods regarded as basal members of this clade. For example, Incisivosaurus gauthieri from the Early Cretaceous of China.

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

4 02, 2024

New Carnotaurus Illustration

By |2024-01-31T15:59:08+00:00February 4th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur has commissioned a new drawing of Carnotaurus sastrei. The abelisaurid drawing will be used in the company’s updated Carnotaurus fact sheet. The Carnotaurus fact sheet is sent out with sales of Carnotaurus models and figures.

A drawing of Carnotaurus sastrei
Everything Dinosaur has commissioned a new drawing of a Carnotaurus (C. sastrei). Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Carnotaurus sastrei

This large theropod was named and described in 1985 by José Fernando Bonaparte. Bonaparte was an extremely influential figure in the development of palaeontology in South America. He is responsible for the scientific description of numerous dinosaurs from Patagonia, and he inspired a new generation of Argentinian palaeontologists.

The Carnotaurus illustration was inspired by the CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Carnotaurus sastrei figure. This popular dinosaur model was introduced in 2019.

The CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Deluxe Carnotaurus.
The CollectA Age of Dinosaurs 1:40 scale deluxe Carnotaurus dinosaur model.

To view the CollectA Deluxe model range: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life Models.

Everything Dinosaur Fact Sheets

A spokesperson for Everything Dinosaur explained that for the vast majority of models and figures that the company supplies a free fact sheet about that prehistoric animal is sent out. Hundreds of fact sheets have been researched and written.

The spokesperson added:

“We continue to add to our free fact sheet inventory. The last two new fact sheets we introduced were for the tyrannosaur Alectrosaurus and the South American theropod Megaraptor namunhuaiquii. We commission illustrations of prehistoric animals such as Carnotaurus and this drawing will be used to update the scale drawing on our Carnotaurus fact sheet.”

The Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur’s Website.

28 01, 2024

Excellent Columbian Mammoth Artwork

By |2024-01-28T11:19:00+00:00January 28th, 2024|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur would like to thank talented young artist James who sent into Everything Dinosaur a stunning illustration of a Columbian mammoth that he had painted.

Columbian mammoth illustrated
Our thanks to talented artist James who produced this excellent illustration of a Columbian mammoth.

Picture credit: James

The prehistoric elephant is shown in lateral view as it moves through a woodland in North America during the Pleistocene Epoch. James has chosen to depict a mature animal given the impressive size of the tusks on this prehistoric elephant.

Columbian Mammoth Artwork

The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) was among the last mammoth species to evolve. It was also one of the largest with some fossil specimens indicating mature bulls some 4.2 metres high at the shoulders. Body weights of the biggest individuals have been estimated at more than twelve tonnes. The last of these amazing creatures are thought to have become extinct around 12,000 years ago.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur thanked James for sending in the image of his Columbian mammoth artwork and exclaimed:

“We do get sent drawings and paintings of Woolly Mammoths, but we don’t receive many illustrations of Columbian mammoths. Our thanks to James for sending in an image of his superb artwork”.

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