Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus “Battle Damage”

Sometimes a model manufacturer goes that little bit further when it comes to adding a degree of authenticity to its figures.  A case in point is Safari Ltd and their recently introduced Wild Safari Prehistoric World, Pachycephalosaurus.  This beautifully painted replica depicts an injury to the skull of this “bone-headed” dinosaur.  There is a small, brown-coloured mark on top of the skull.  Eagle-eyed Everything Dinosaur team members noticed this feature when looking at pre-production images, but it had been difficult to spot in some promotional shots.

However, we can confirm this little bit of pachycephalosaur pathology is indeed an integral part of the model.

Showing the “Pachycephalosaur Pathology” – The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus with the Mark on its Head

Showing the pathology on the head of the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus dinosaur model.
A close-up view of the top of the head of the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus model with the “battle damage” highlighted. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the new for 2020 Pachycephalosaurus model and the rest of the figures available from Everything Dinosaur in the Wild Safari Prehistoric World range: Safari Ltd – Wild Safari Prehistoric World Models and Figures.

The Pathology of Pachycephalosaurus

A number of theories have been put forward as to why pachycephalosaurs tended to have highly ornate, often very thick skulls.  These anatomical features probably did not evolve to protect their brains, the brains of these types of dinosaur are proportionately no bigger than many other types of ornithischians.  They probably did not have a defensive role, after all, to a large tyrannosaurid a thick, reinforced skull would have been not much of an obstacle to overcome if it were fortunate to catch a pachycephalosaur.

Many palaeontologists believe these characteristics evolved as these animals competed with each other in combat over hierarchical status in the herd, or the right to mate.   This theory was, we believe, first postulated by the distinguished American vertebrate palaeontologist Edwin Colbert in 1954.  Since then, a number of studies have been undertaken to verify/refute this idea: Study Sheds New Light on the Intraspecific Combat of Pachycephalosaurs.

Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis Replica Skull

A replica skull of Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis.
Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis replica skull.   In some specimens the skull bone is more than twenty centimetres thick. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

However these Late Cretaceous dinosaurs used their heavily ornate and robust headgear remains open to speculation, but one thing is for sure, the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus model certainly shows lots of detail.

A Beautiful and Very Detailed Dinosaur Model

The new for 2020 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus dinosaur model.
The new for 2020 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus model.  The “battle damage” to the skull can be seen in this image of the dinosaur. Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur.

Picture credit: Everything Dinosaur

Visit the Everything Dinosaur website: Everything Dinosaur.

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